Production Marks: Geometry, Psychology and the Electronic Age

05 August - 24 August 2008
Main

Commissioned by and first presented at the National Arts Festival (Grahamstown, 2008), Production Marks: Geometry, Psychology and the Electronic Age examines how artists use the exactitude of mathematics to create chaos and, from that chaos, create new forms.

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“Modern architecture was a hedonistic movement; abstraction, rigor and severity were no more than kinds of artifice that led to the creation of the most provocative description of the experience of modern life. Today it is possible to employ this conception by adapting it to contemporary conditions. In the presence of a globalized economy, the extraordinary zenith of the media and the complexity of computer networking, abstraction, rigor and severity will once again become the things that will lead us to create the most provocative description of contemporary experience. – Synchronizing Geometry: Landscape, Architecture and Construction (Actar, Barcelona, 2006), published in response to the retrospective exhibition of the work by the Carlos Ferrater Studio (Office of Architecture in Barcelona), Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, September 2006

Commissioned by and first presented at the National Arts Festival (Grahamstown, 2008), Production Marks: Geometry, Psychology and the Electronic Age examines how artists use the exactitude of mathematics to create chaos and, from that chaos, create new forms. Curator Brenton Maart (KZNSA Gallery, Durban) has selected the work of South African contemporary artists Zander Blom, Marco Cianfanelli, Paul Edmunds, Retha Erasmus, Stephen Hobbs, Doung Anwar Jahangeer and Andrew Verster to demonstrate that we need not lament the systematic collapse of structure. Instead, the exhibition illustrates that entropy – the physical principle of constant collapse – provides the building blocks for assembly into new forms. It is this celebration of the unstable that ultimately allows for continual and creative construction. In essence, the exhibition is an acknowledgement of inevitable anarchy, and a celebration of the new forms that grow from the rubble.

One way to demonstrate this cycle is to examine the manifestation of thoughts. Plans, 2D drawings on paper, originate in the mind; these plans, in turn, give rise to 3D structures. The artists on exhibition were selected for the way they present the interplay between 2 and 3 dimensions; between the workings of the mind and the physical reality. It is this play between dimensions – and their extension into the fourth and fifth dimensions, that allows the exhibition to allude to the fact that it is the systematic restructuring of structure that helps us understand the spiritual structure within the chaotic contemporary world in which we live.

The exhibition is scheduled to travel to the Goethe Institute, Johannesburg from 1 – 22 September 2008.

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